Wednesday, 26 June 2013

Our Lady of Vladimir

Another icon courtesy of Johnthelutheran

One day I must learn how to "read" icons properly. The Mary knows all too well what lies in the future; this Jesus has an adult face on his child-like body. It makes me desperately sad to contemplate it; a mother's worst nightmare.

It reminds me of a child with a degenerative disease that I briefly taught; how appalling for the parents, to see their beautiful girl slowly succumb to the disease robbing her of movement, speech, intellect and finally life. Maybe this icon would be a comfort, in the way that the suffering Jesus indicates that he is with us through EVERYTHING.


byzantio:


Our Lady of Vladimir
First third of the 12th century Wood, tempera 104 x 69
The most Orthodox and revered icon in medieval Russia, «Our Lady of Vladimir» was brought from Constantinople in the early 12th century; it was destined to become the holy of holies of the Russian state. The icon was kept in Vyshgorod, near Kiev. But it became especially revere not in Kiev but in Vladimir, where the icon was sent in 1155 by Prince Andrei Bogoliubsky. The splendid white-stone church the Assumption of the Virgin was especially built to house the icon of «Our Lady of Vladimir». On 26 August (8 September in the New Style calendar) 1395, during the attack by Tamerlane, the icon was solemnly transferred to Moscow and on this day Tamerlane retreated and left the territory of Muscovy. After this the image was returned to Vladimir, but in 1480 it was again taken to the great Moscow church of the Assumption, where it remained till 1918. The Greek name of this iconographic type – Eleus – can be translated literally as «showing mercy». In medieval Russia this type of iconography was called «Umilenie – Tender Affection», which corresponds more closely to the imagery: the Child’s cheek is tenderly pressed up against Our Lady’s face; he embraces her with his left hand, and Our Lady holds the Child with her right hand, leaning her head towards him. A characteristic feature of this iconography is that the left foot of the Child is bent in such a way that His heel is seen. The icon is drawn on two sides. On the obverse there is a depiction of the «Throne of the Second Coming (Đ•timasia)». The painting on the obverse evokes controversy to this day: some date it to the 15th century, others to the 19th century.

from the Tretyakov Gallery.
http://johnthelutheran.tumblr.com/post/52395053512/byzantio-our-lady-of-vladimir-first-third-of


The most Orthodox and revered icon in medieval Russia, «Our Lady of Vladimir» was brought from Constantinople in the early 12th century; it was destined to become the holy of holies of the Russian state. The icon was kept in Vyshgorod, near Kiev. But it became especially revere not in Kiev but in Vladimir, where the icon was sent in 1155 by Prince Andrei Bogoliubsky. The splendid white-stone church the Assumption of the Virgin was especially built to house the icon of «Our Lady of Vladimir». On 26 August (8 September in the New Style calendar) 1395, during the attack by Tamerlane, the icon was solemnly transferred to Moscow and on this day Tamerlane retreated and left the territory of Muscovy. After this the image was returned to Vladimir, but in 1480 it was again taken to the great Moscow church of the Assumption, where it remained till 1918. The Greek name of this iconographic type – Eleus – can be translated literally as «showing mercy». In medieval Russia this type of iconography was called «Umilenie – Tender Affection», which corresponds more closely to the imagery: the Child’s cheek is tenderly pressed up against Our Lady’s face; he embraces her with his left hand, and Our Lady holds the Child with her right hand, leaning her head towards him. A characteristic feature of this iconography is that the left foot of the Child is bent in such a way that His heel is seen. The icon is drawn on two sides. On the obverse there is a depiction of the «Throne of the Second Coming (Đ•timasia)». The painting on the obverse evokes controversy to this day: some date it to the 15th century, others to the 19th century.
from the Tretyakov Gallery.




Monday, 24 June 2013

Poetry and the Self




Most people ignore most poetry
because
most poetry ignores most people
Adrian Mitchell
 
Another post from Johnthelutheran (where does he get them from?!?)http://johnthelutheran.tumblr.com/post/53581110739/most-people-ignore-most-poetry-because-most
 
 
Is this another call to be true to yourself? Or, for a follower of Christ, and someone who believes that God's Spirit is real and active within their soul, then a call to be true to the work of the Creator within?

"Being true to oneself"

"If choosing one’s values is just some mysterious feel thing conducted in the isolated crucible of the disengaged self, it becomes little more than an emotional lucky dip, easily manipulated by forces outside the self that are not being critically examined. No wonder ‘being true to yourself’ has so little resistance to the power of advertising.
 
 
 
 
 
Which is why we need to remember our catechism (or at least the one I learned at my Convent school)    http://www.proecclesia.com/penny%20catechism/
 
"Who made you?"  God made me
"Why did he make you?"  God made me to know him, love him and serve him in this world, and to be happy with him forever in the next
 
Nothing there about "being true to yourself" - it's ALL about being true to what God made you, as a unique and holy and loved individual.
 
Somewhere, I have got the tattered red paper catechism that we were all given, whether we were Catholic or not (I'm not) by the nuns, and which we studied in RE lessons. This has inspired me to go and look for it (but I will probably have forgotten about this inspiration before I get back upstairs - such is the frailty of human nature.)
 

Flashmob adoration of the host, Ascension Day Preston

ccr.org.uk/archive/gn1109 is article about it (back in 2009) and is the video

Wish I had been there....

wonder if we could do it here....

What an amazing summary of the Bible. Need to make a transcription of it to come back to...

Saturday, 8 June 2013

Madonna and Child

I'm starting a new category of "Pictures that I want to keep track of and not lose"

This picture comes from here: http://byzantio.tumblr.com/post/30057042927/late-13th-c-mosaic-icon-the-byzantine-museum

It's not a blog that I follow, so someone else must have re-posted it.

I'm not skilled at reading pictures, or patient at stopping and looking at pictures. Sometimes I read someone else's explanation, meditation, call it what you will, and think - wow!

This one is easy to read - the Baby, totally focused on his Mother, snuggling into her neck, hand reaching for her. The Mother, head bent towards the Babe, right hand wrapped around him, and left hand somehow beckoning us closer.

Their expressions are tranquil, but is there a sadness in their eyes? In hers, certainly. I hope the babe is still innocent of his future. Let him be a little baby, and a carefree child, for as long as possible.


Late 13th c. Mosaic Icon.
@the Byzantine Museum of Athens